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The Resource Words that changed America : great speeches that inspired, challenged, healed, and enlightened, [edited by] Alex Barnett

Words that changed America : great speeches that inspired, challenged, healed, and enlightened, [edited by] Alex Barnett

Label
Words that changed America : great speeches that inspired, challenged, healed, and enlightened
Title
Words that changed America
Title remainder
great speeches that inspired, challenged, healed, and enlightened
Statement of responsibility
[edited by] Alex Barnett
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"A great speech has the power to challenge and inspire. At every pivotal point in American history -- from the Revolution to the shock and destruction of September 11, 2001 -- there has been a great speech. Painstakingly researched and arranged by themes around which the United States grew and fought and matured, Words That Changed America offers a powerful and profound glimpse of the power of speech. Speeches inspired the Revolution, and healed the wounds of the Civil War. Speeches abolished slavery, won women the right to vote, and sent millions of Americans to war in Europe and Asia. Many speeches were, in fact, important historical events themselves. After Patrick Henry stood up in the Virginia legislature and demanded liberty or death, the Revolutionary War was nearly inevitable. James Madison's 1788 speech in support of the proposed Constitution may well have saved that document from the dustbin of history. In 1917 and 1941, both Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt convinced a nation leery of foreign entanglement that its own interests were vitally involved in a war that was leveling Europe. Other speeches in this collection provide vivid snapshots of America's most dramatic hours: Harry S. Truman revealing the existence of the atomic bomb; John F. Kennedy announcing that the Soviet Union had installed missiles in Cuba; Lyndon B. Johnson reporting that a skirmish in the Gulf of Tonkin would prompt the need to send more troops to Vietnam; Joseph McCarthy extolling the need to remove Communists from positions of power. Other great orations were passionate, emotional pleas on matters of conscience: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s powerful I Have a Dream; abolutionist Elijah Lovejoy's final defense of his views before he was murdered by a proslavery mob; Elizabeth Cady Stanton's demand for the right of women to vote; anarchist Emma Goldman's plea for the right to dissent. Each speech is placed in context by Alex Barnett, whose capsule introductions themselves offer a rich panorama of American history. Words That Changed America will inform and enrich any reader. Book jacket."--Jacket
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
808.5/1/0973
Index
index present
LC call number
E173
LC item number
.W86 2003
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Barnett, Alex
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
  • Speeches, addresses, etc., American
Label
Words that changed America : great speeches that inspired, challenged, healed, and enlightened, [edited by] Alex Barnett
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (page 321) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Henry Highland Garnet, A call to rebellion, August 15, 1843
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Keynote address at Seneca Falls, July 19, 1848
  • Susan B. Anthony, Are women persons?, 1873.
  • Part two: A more perfect union.
  • Thomas Jefferson, The commerce between master and slave, 1782
  • Benjamin Franklin, Closing speech at the constitutional convention, September 17, 1787
  • James Madison, Speech in favor of the federal constitution, June 6, 1788
  • George Washington, Farewell address, September 19, 1796
  • Daniel Webster, Second reply to Hayne, January 26, 1830
  • Andrew Jackson, Proclamation regarding nullification, December 10, 1832
  • Part one: The consent of the governed.
  • Andrew Jackson, Message to Seminoles, February 16, 1835
  • William Lloyd Garrison, To the public, January 1, 1831
  • Angelina Grimke, Speech at Pennsylvania Hall, May 16, 1838
  • Frederick Douglass, What to the slave is the fourth of July?, July 5, 1852
  • Henry Clay, The Compromise of 1850, February 5 and 6, 1850
  • Abraham Lincoln, Speech on the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, October 16, 1854
  • John Brown, Address to court, November 2, 1859
  • Abraham Lincoln, Cooper Institute address, February 27, 1860
  • Jefferson Davis, Farewell address, January 21, 1861
  • Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg address, November 19, 1863
  • Declarations of the Stamp Act Congress, October 2, 1765
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Memorial Day address, May 30, 1884
  • Abraham Lincoln, Second inaugural address, March 4, 1865
  • Frederick Douglass, Appeal to Congress for impartial suffrage, January, 1867
  • Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce, Upon surrendering to the U.S. Army, October 5, 1877
  • Booker T. Washington, Atlanta exposition address, September 18, 1895
  • W.E.B. Du Bois, Speech at Harpers Ferry, August 16, 1906
  • Ida B. Well-Barnett, Lynching: our national crime, April 1909
  • Anna Howard Shaw, The fundamental principle of a republic, June 21, 1915
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., I have a dream, August 28, 1963
  • Patrick Henry, Liberty or death, March 23, 1775
  • Thomas Paine, Common sense, January 1776
  • Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776
  • George Washington, Speech to his officers at Newburgh, New York, March 15, 1783
  • Thomas Jefferson, First inaugural address, March 4, 1801
  • Tecumseh, Sleep not longer, September 1811
  • The Sedition Act, 1918
  • Emma Goldman, Address to the jury, July 9, 1917
  • Robert La Follette, Free speech in wartime, October 6, 1917
  • Eugene Debs, Speech in Canton, Ohio, June 16, 1918
  • Margaret Sanger, A moral necessity for birth control
  • Joseph McCarthy, Speech at Wheeling, West Virginia, February 9, 1950
  • Margaret Chase Smith, A declaration of conscience, June 1, 1950
  • Memoirs of a woman of pleasure v. Massachusetts, March 21, 1966
  • The Pentagon Papers, 1971.
  • Part four: America and the world.
  • Part three: Freedom of speech.
  • George Washington, General orders, July 2, 1776
  • William Pit, You cannot conquer America, November 18, 1777
  • George Washington, Farewell address, September 19, 1796
  • John Quincy Adams, She goes not abroad, July 4, 1821
  • Theodore Roosevelt, The strenuous life, April 10, 1899
  • William Jennings Bryan, The flag of empire, August 8, 1900
  • Woodrow Wilson, War message, April 2, 1917
  • Woodrow Wilson, The league of nations, September 25, 1919
  • Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr., Against the league of nations, August 12, 1919
  • Winston Churchill, Dunkirk, June 4, 1940
  • Benjamin Franklin, An apology for printers, June 10, 1731
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt, The four freedoms, January 6, 1941
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt, War message, December 8, 1941
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Orders of the day, June 6, 1944
  • Harry S. Truman, Hiroshima statement, August 6, 1945
  • Winston Churchill, The iron curtain, March 5, 1946
  • George C. Marshall, Commencement address at Harvard University, June 5, 1947
  • Harry S. Truman, What we are doing in Korea, April 16, 1951
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Atoms for peace, December 8, 1953
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell address, January 17, 1961
  • John F. Kennedy, Inaugural address, January 20, 1961
  • Andrew Hamilton, In defense of Zenger, August 4, 1735
  • John F. Kennedy, The Cuban missile crisis, October 22, 1962
  • Lydon Johnson, The Gulf of Tonkin incident, August 4, 1964
  • Richard Nixon, Vietnamization, November 3, 1969
  • John Kerry, Testimony before Senate foreign relations committee, April 22, 1971
  • Ronald Reagan, Triumph over evil, June 8, 1982
  • Ronald Reagan, Tear down this wall, June 12, 1987
  • George H.W. Bush, Desert Storm, January 16, 1991
  • George H. Bush, Freedom and fear, September 20, 2001
  • The First Amendment, 1791
  • The Sedition Act, 1798
  • Elijiah Lovejoy, Last public speech, November 3, 1837
  • Wendell Phillips, The death of Lovejoy, December 8, 1837
  • Frederick Douglass, A plea for free speech in Boston, December 10, 1860
Control code
ocm51505366
Dimensions
19 cm
Extent
x, 320, [4] pages
Isbn
9781585748402
Lccn
2003000969
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Stock number
1166468
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o51505366
  • (OCoLC)51505366
Label
Words that changed America : great speeches that inspired, challenged, healed, and enlightened, [edited by] Alex Barnett
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (page 321) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Henry Highland Garnet, A call to rebellion, August 15, 1843
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Keynote address at Seneca Falls, July 19, 1848
  • Susan B. Anthony, Are women persons?, 1873.
  • Part two: A more perfect union.
  • Thomas Jefferson, The commerce between master and slave, 1782
  • Benjamin Franklin, Closing speech at the constitutional convention, September 17, 1787
  • James Madison, Speech in favor of the federal constitution, June 6, 1788
  • George Washington, Farewell address, September 19, 1796
  • Daniel Webster, Second reply to Hayne, January 26, 1830
  • Andrew Jackson, Proclamation regarding nullification, December 10, 1832
  • Part one: The consent of the governed.
  • Andrew Jackson, Message to Seminoles, February 16, 1835
  • William Lloyd Garrison, To the public, January 1, 1831
  • Angelina Grimke, Speech at Pennsylvania Hall, May 16, 1838
  • Frederick Douglass, What to the slave is the fourth of July?, July 5, 1852
  • Henry Clay, The Compromise of 1850, February 5 and 6, 1850
  • Abraham Lincoln, Speech on the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, October 16, 1854
  • John Brown, Address to court, November 2, 1859
  • Abraham Lincoln, Cooper Institute address, February 27, 1860
  • Jefferson Davis, Farewell address, January 21, 1861
  • Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg address, November 19, 1863
  • Declarations of the Stamp Act Congress, October 2, 1765
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Memorial Day address, May 30, 1884
  • Abraham Lincoln, Second inaugural address, March 4, 1865
  • Frederick Douglass, Appeal to Congress for impartial suffrage, January, 1867
  • Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce, Upon surrendering to the U.S. Army, October 5, 1877
  • Booker T. Washington, Atlanta exposition address, September 18, 1895
  • W.E.B. Du Bois, Speech at Harpers Ferry, August 16, 1906
  • Ida B. Well-Barnett, Lynching: our national crime, April 1909
  • Anna Howard Shaw, The fundamental principle of a republic, June 21, 1915
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., I have a dream, August 28, 1963
  • Patrick Henry, Liberty or death, March 23, 1775
  • Thomas Paine, Common sense, January 1776
  • Thomas Jefferson, The Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776
  • George Washington, Speech to his officers at Newburgh, New York, March 15, 1783
  • Thomas Jefferson, First inaugural address, March 4, 1801
  • Tecumseh, Sleep not longer, September 1811
  • The Sedition Act, 1918
  • Emma Goldman, Address to the jury, July 9, 1917
  • Robert La Follette, Free speech in wartime, October 6, 1917
  • Eugene Debs, Speech in Canton, Ohio, June 16, 1918
  • Margaret Sanger, A moral necessity for birth control
  • Joseph McCarthy, Speech at Wheeling, West Virginia, February 9, 1950
  • Margaret Chase Smith, A declaration of conscience, June 1, 1950
  • Memoirs of a woman of pleasure v. Massachusetts, March 21, 1966
  • The Pentagon Papers, 1971.
  • Part four: America and the world.
  • Part three: Freedom of speech.
  • George Washington, General orders, July 2, 1776
  • William Pit, You cannot conquer America, November 18, 1777
  • George Washington, Farewell address, September 19, 1796
  • John Quincy Adams, She goes not abroad, July 4, 1821
  • Theodore Roosevelt, The strenuous life, April 10, 1899
  • William Jennings Bryan, The flag of empire, August 8, 1900
  • Woodrow Wilson, War message, April 2, 1917
  • Woodrow Wilson, The league of nations, September 25, 1919
  • Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr., Against the league of nations, August 12, 1919
  • Winston Churchill, Dunkirk, June 4, 1940
  • Benjamin Franklin, An apology for printers, June 10, 1731
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt, The four freedoms, January 6, 1941
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt, War message, December 8, 1941
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Orders of the day, June 6, 1944
  • Harry S. Truman, Hiroshima statement, August 6, 1945
  • Winston Churchill, The iron curtain, March 5, 1946
  • George C. Marshall, Commencement address at Harvard University, June 5, 1947
  • Harry S. Truman, What we are doing in Korea, April 16, 1951
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Atoms for peace, December 8, 1953
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell address, January 17, 1961
  • John F. Kennedy, Inaugural address, January 20, 1961
  • Andrew Hamilton, In defense of Zenger, August 4, 1735
  • John F. Kennedy, The Cuban missile crisis, October 22, 1962
  • Lydon Johnson, The Gulf of Tonkin incident, August 4, 1964
  • Richard Nixon, Vietnamization, November 3, 1969
  • John Kerry, Testimony before Senate foreign relations committee, April 22, 1971
  • Ronald Reagan, Triumph over evil, June 8, 1982
  • Ronald Reagan, Tear down this wall, June 12, 1987
  • George H.W. Bush, Desert Storm, January 16, 1991
  • George H. Bush, Freedom and fear, September 20, 2001
  • The First Amendment, 1791
  • The Sedition Act, 1798
  • Elijiah Lovejoy, Last public speech, November 3, 1837
  • Wendell Phillips, The death of Lovejoy, December 8, 1837
  • Frederick Douglass, A plea for free speech in Boston, December 10, 1860
Control code
ocm51505366
Dimensions
19 cm
Extent
x, 320, [4] pages
Isbn
9781585748402
Lccn
2003000969
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Stock number
1166468
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o51505366
  • (OCoLC)51505366

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